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COVID-19

FTC warnings target companies claiming to cure COVID-19

Nick Wicker  

Nick Wicker  

(June 11, 2020) - The Federal Trade Commission has issued an additional string of warning letters to the sellers of products claiming to treat or prevent COVID-19, bringing the total of such notices to more than 160 since the coronavirus pandemic began.

FTC Press Release, FTC Sends Letters Warning 35 More Marketers to Stop Making Unsupported Claims That Their Products and Therapies Can Effectively Prevent or Treat COVID-19, 2020 WL 2989168 (June 4, 2020).
 
The agency says its June 4 warning letters to 35 companies and individuals focused on marketers that advertised injectables and other treatments for the illness caused by the novel coronavirus, for which no known cure or treatment exists.

Fraudulent claims continue to mount

In a statement, the FTC said it has sent warning letters to more than 160 companies and individuals in “its ongoing efforts to protect consumers from health-related COVID-19 scams.”
 
Of the 35 companies and individuals targeted in the June 4 warning letters, 13 allegedly sold IV fluid drip injection and ozone clinical treatments, while 17 allegedly sold unproven herbal remedies and supplements.
 
Companies marketing essential oils, homeopathic remedies and even stem cell treatments also received the FTC’s June 4 letters.
 
One California company was marketing what the FTC described as “electromagnetic field blocking patches.”
 
Each of the warning recipients was given two days to stop their misleading claims and report back to the FTC with the explicit remedies the individuals and companies had taken, the agency said in the statement.
 
The FTC sent a second round of six warning letters to marketing companies that claimed to offer their audience income to compensate them for lost wages caused by the coronavirus, the agency announced June 5.

To keep up-dated on the latest news and information regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, the economic impact, and the government’s response, at Thomson Reuters’ COVID-19 Resource Center, and you can follow Reuters.com or the Reuters App.

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