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Reuters Photojournalism: Capturing life through a wider lens

Reuters has awarded eight grants to help nurture a new generation of photojournalists. Hailing from Alexandria to Zanzibar, here are the winners.

To succeed in its vital mission of representing the world as it truly is, journalism needs a broad spectrum of backgrounds, vantage points and ideas. To that end, Reuters recently awarded eight US$5,000 grants to emerging photographers whose work will help the news agency – and the industry at large – develop a diverse new generation of photojournalists.

“The Reuters Pictures grant program gives a rare opportunity to eight photojournalists from diverse backgrounds and from around the world to work with Reuters and develop their talent,” said Yannis Behrakis, a senior editor of special projects for Reuters who will mentor the recipients. “I will be dedicating plenty of time to mentor each of them and help them understand in depth the needs of the industry in the digital age.”

Behrakis was a member of the Reuters Pictures team that won the 2016 Breaking News Photography Pulitzer Prize for its work covering the immigration crisis in Greece.

The eight recipients are:

Daro Sulakauri

Daro Sulakauribased in Tbilisi, Georgia, has been previously recognized at the Vienna Photo Festival and was a 2016 winner of the EU Prize for Journalism in the “Best Photo” category. Sulukauri’s work includes documenting a hidden narrative of the Chechen conflict and a story on early marriages in Georgia.

“I am really honored on being chosen as one of the Reuters grantees,” she said. “As a Georgian photojournalist, it opens opportunities that will allow me to further enhance my work by challenging me with new assignments from unfamiliar parts of the world.”

Festival of Victory day, where young men hold toy guns and play war games, is pictured in the Chechen refugee settlement of Pankisi Gorge. By most estimates, approximately 5,000 Chechens escaped the deadly war in Chechnya by fleeing to Pankisi Gorge. Photo credit/DARO SULAKAURI
Festival of Victory day, where young men hold toy guns and play war games, is pictured in the Chechen refugee settlement of Pankisi Gorge. By most estimates, approximately 5,000 Chechens escaped the deadly war in Chechnya by fleeing to Pankisi Gorge. Photo credit/DARO SULAKAURI

Thomas Nicolon

Thomas Nicolon covers wildlife conservation and environmental issues in Central Africa. His work has appeared in Africa Geographic, National Geographic France and Le Monde.  He settled in the Democratic Republic of Congo in 2015, where he now documents conservation in conflict zones.

“I’m very grateful, since this grant will allow me to carry out my project on illegal wildlife trade in the Congo basin,” he said.

A park ranger on patrol in the Democractic Republic of Congo’s Salonga National Park, the largest rainforest park in Africa. Photo credit/THOMAS NICOLON
A park ranger on patrol in the Democractic Republic of Congo’s Salonga National Park, the largest rainforest park in Africa. Photo credit/THOMAS NICOLON

Heba Khamis

Heba Khamis is an Egyptian visual researcher and photographer based in Alexandria. After volunteering in Uganda, she took an interest in using photojournalism to concentrate on “social issues that are sometimes ignored.” Her recent work has featured breast ironing in Cameroon, gay prostitution among refugees in Germany and life for transgender people in Egypt.

Thirteen-year-old Marianne's grandmother started to perform breast-ironing on her one month before this image was taken. The ritual is carried out by pressing the breast with a stick and wooden bowl. Photo credit/HEBA KHAMIS
Thirteen-year-old Marianne’s grandmother started to perform breast-ironing on her one month before this image was taken. The ritual is carried out by pressing the breast with a stick and wooden bowl. Photo credit/HEBA KHAMIS

Loren Elliott

Loren Elliott has worked for the Columbia Missourian, the San Francisco Chronicle and the Tampa Bay Times. In 2017, his portfolio placed third in Picture of the Year International’s “Newspaper Photographer of the Year” category. Now based in Houston, Texas, United States, Elliott has focused much of his work on the U.S.-Mexico border, where he has tried to show what immigration looks like in the increasingly politicized Rio Grande Valley.

“The Reuters grant will afford me the opportunity to dig into a story of inequality and injustice in my own backyard,” he said. “I’m honored and grateful to receive the support of Reuters in telling this story and getting it in front of as many eyes as possible.”

Jose Hernandez, center, holds hands with Victor Bayez as they grieve the loss of friends Amanda Alvear and Mercedez Flores, both killed by a gunman in the mass shooting at Pulse nightclub, during a vigil in downtown Orlando, Fla., June 13, 2016. Photo credit/ LOREN SINGER
Jose Hernandez, center, holds hands with Victor Bayez as they grieve the loss of friends Amanda Alvear and Mercedez Flores, both killed by a gunman in the mass shooting at Pulse nightclub, during a vigil in downtown Orlando, Fla., June 13, 2016. Photo credit/ LOREN SINGER

Nicky Woo

Nicky Woo divides her time between Zanzibar, Tanzania and New York City. Before enrolling at Parsons School of Design, where she is now a visiting professor, Woo studied psychology. Her work has appeared in Marie Claire, Men’s Health and Interview magazines.

The Ethiopian festival of Timket, commemorates the baptism of Jesus Christ. Priests bless the various bodies of water -lakes, streams, and even common taps - making it sacred . The holy water can either be dunked into or thrown on passers-by in a ritual reenactment of baptism. Here, encouraged by their parents, children strip down in a reservoir newly sanctified." Photo credit/NICKY WOO
The Ethiopian festival of Timket, commemorates the baptism of Jesus Christ. Priests bless the various bodies of water – lakes, streams, and even common taps – making it sacred. The holy water can either be dunked into or thrown on passers-by in a ritual reenactment of baptism. Here, encouraged by their parents, children strip down in a reservoir newly sanctified. Photo credit/NICKY WOO

Manuel Seoane

Manuel Seoane works for Qamasa newspaper in La Paz, Bolivia. He covers events of note, including stories involving the migrant communities in Bolivia’s capital.

“To receive this Reuters grant is to open that much-desired door to worldwide photojournalism,” he said. “It is a unique opportunity to push a professional career in the right direction. I am thrilled and honored.”

"Presents and souvenirs become very important in Aymara celebrations. Among the most common ones are portraits with famous TV people. Sylvester Stallone, Jean-Claude Van Damme, Shakira and Osama Bin Laden are highly requested.” Photo credit>Manuel Seaone
Presents and souvenirs become very important in Aymara celebrations. Among the most common ones are portraits with famous TV people. Sylvester Stallone, Jean-Claude Van Damme, Shakira and Osama Bin Laden are highly requested. Photo credit/MANUEL SEOANE

Gabriel Scarlett

Gabriel Scarlett, a native of Louisville, Kentucky, U.S., has worked for The Denver Post and Los Angeles Times. He studies photojournalism, Arabic and emergency medicine at Western Kentucky University.

As dusk approaches, a girl named Desaire explores the dry scrubland that surrounds her rural home outside of Thoreau, New Mexico, United States. Gaddy was moved back onto the Navajo Nation Reservation from her life in Florida to stay with relatives who live without running water due to the ongoing water crisis on the reservation. Photo credit/GABRIEL SCARLETT
As dusk approaches, a girl named Desaire explores the dry scrubland that surrounds her rural home outside of Thoreau, New Mexico, U.S. Gaddy was moved back onto the Navajo Nation Reservation from her life in Florida to stay with relatives who live without running water due to the ongoing water crisis on the reservation. Photo credit/GABRIEL SCARLETT

Ekaterina Anchevskaya

Ekaterina Anchevskaya works in Turkey and her native Russia. Her work often chronicles the distinctive character of her homeland.

A Syrian refugee and her mother are pictured hours before the engagement party, doing the last arrangements in a pastry shop in Kilis, Turkey. Photo credit/ EKATERINA ANCHEVSKAYA
A Syrian refugee and her mother are pictured hours before the engagement party, doing the last arrangements in a pastry shop in Kilis, Turkey. Photo credit/ EKATERINA ANCHEVSKAYA

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