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States of the Nation: Who will win the U.S. election?

Each week, Reuters/IPSOS polls more than 15,000 Americans for 'States of the Nation' to determine who is likely to win the U.S. presidential race.

Who will become the next president of the United States? The world will find out in November; however, you can explore predictions now for who is likely to win through Reuters States of the Nation.

The new interactive presidential election tool is powered by a Reuters survey with polling partner IPSOS of more than 15,000 Americans each week, to show how each of the candidates’ support translates at the state level in the Electoral College and how changes in turnout among demographic and political groups could affect the result.

Users can build their own scenarios based on voter turnout by selecting demographics such as sex, age cohort, race and ethnicity, income range, and party affiliation to see how those factors impact the outcome.

“‘States of the Nation’ allows anyone – from the most sophisticated social scientists and political junkies to curious laymen – to examine how different groups and demographics can affect the race,” said Reuters editor Mo Tamman, the creator of the project. “Come November, it all comes down to turnout, and with such a huge amount of data driving our projection, we’re able to offer a more informed and nuanced understanding of how changes in turnout can drive profound shifts at the ballot box. We believe this is a substantive addition to the campaign-coverage landscape but is also a tool that users will find useful, entertaining and perhaps even edifying.”


Learn more

Stay current on all of the election happenings from Reuters by checking out Reuters.com and on the Reuters app. Plus, follow along on Twitter @ReutersPolitics, Instagram @reuters, and through Facebook Live reports.

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