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Thomson Reuters at Pride in London 2016

By Timothy Smith, Content Manager at Thomson Reuters

Much has changed in London since the first Pride Parade in 1972. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) people have many more rights and suffer less discrimination than ever before. However there is still a long way to go, both legally and socially – even in a fantastic melting pot like London.

This year’s Pride in London theme was #Nofilter, which to this gay man sounded more like a rejection of his preferred coffee order, rather than something to march through London for.  But it is actually a very important message.

While we have improved equality in the eyes of the law, many of us still look over our shoulder when we hold hands with our partner, or think twice about kissing them in public or talking about our lives at work. The #Nofilter theme was designed to encourage us to live our lives without filtering out aspects that define us, and to show our true self both in and outside of work.

For the fourth year in a row, Thomson Reuters had a big presence in the fabulous parade, and for the second year we sponsored the event. Over 80 colleagues from Thomson Reuters Pride at Work network for LGBT+ employees and their friends donned our t-shirts, hoisted our banners and flags and prepared to spread the #Nofilter message. We distributed 10,000 beautifully crafted orange Crowns, sharing a bit of fun with the crowd, and demonstrating that Thomson Reuters is a place where you can be yourself at work.

Employees from Thomson Reuters carry the banner at the 2016 Pride in London festival.

As sponsors of the event, we also built the official app for Pride in London.  This was the first time that Pride in London has had its own app, to help plan and personalise the Pride in London festival experience that ran from 13-26 June.  Over 10,000 people downloaded the app, including over 1,000 downloads in two hours on Saturday morning.  We are thrilled to have been able to support the event in this way.

In a month when we have been reminded of the problems the LGBT community still face with the shootings in the Pulse Nightclub in Orlando, we must also remember the ongoing fight for LGBT rights in the 77 countries where it’s illegal to be LGBT+, or even in England and Wales where over 5000 hate crimes were recorded against LGBT people last year. It is as important today as it was 1972 that we continue to fight for the right to be ourselves and for all of us to live our lives with #nofilter.


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