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Archive: where does Brexit leave UK overseas territories?

Daniel Greenberg

04 Mar 2019

Timeline outlining all of the previous updates as they unfolded on Brexit, and how it will impact UK overseas territories. 

Reviewed as of 3 June 2019:

Different overseas territories of the UK have different kinds of relationship with the EU already. For example, Gibraltar is treated for many purposes as if it were a Member State, and the Isle of Man is bound by Treaty obligations set out in a particular protocol, while the Falkland Islands have very little formal relationship with the EU.

The government has reassured each of the overseas territories that their position and interest will be taken into account in the formation of the withdrawal agreement. Given the difficulty in establishing even the key terms of the agreements within the timescale required by the Brexit deadline, however, it is perhaps reasonable to expect that it may not be possible to give as much attention to the details of individual territories’ relationship with the EU as they might think desirable.

It remains to be seen whether individual territories will attempt to make their own agreements with the EU after Brexit, as to which there may be some scope legally but as to which there may be considerable political difficulty.

Update as of 28 November 2018: 

Different overseas territories of the UK have different kinds of relationship with the EU already. For example, Gibraltar is treated for many purposes as if it were a Member State, the Isle of Man is bound by Treaty obligations set out in a particular protocol, while the Falkland Islands have very little formal relationship with the EU.

The Government has reassured each of the overseas territories that their position and interest will be taken into account in the formation of the withdrawal agreement. Given the difficulty in establishing even the key terms of the agreements within the timescale required by the Brexit deadline, however, it is perhaps reasonable to expect that it may not be possible to give as much attention to the details of individual territories’ relationship with the EU as they might think desirable.

It remains to be seen whether individual territories will attempt to make their own agreements with the EU after Brexit, as to which there may be some scope legally but as to which there may be considerable political difficulty.

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