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Executive Perspectives

EXECUTIVE PERSPECTIVE: “These tragedies must end. And to end them, we must change”

Emily Flitter, Dan Burns

17 Dec 2012

(Reuters) – The small Connecticut town shattered by an act President Barack Obama called “unconscionable evil,” holds on Monday the first two of 20 funerals for schoolchildren massacred in their classrooms last week.

Twenty-seven wood painted angels are displayed outside of a home to honor the victims killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut December 16, 2012. Twelve girls, eight boys and six adult women were killed in the shooting on Friday at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown. REUTERS/Joshua Lott

Meanwhile, schools across the country will reopen their doors to confused and scared children full of questions about why the Newtown, Connecticut, shooting happened – and whether they are safe from the very same danger.

Obama, addressing an interfaith vigil in Newtown on Sunday night, spoke forcefully on the country’s failings in protecting its children and demanded changes in response to the mass shootings of the last few months.

“We can’t tolerate this anymore. These tragedies must end. And to end them, we must change,” he said, adding that he would bring together law enforcement, teachers, mental health professionals and others to study how to best stop the violence.

View President Obama’s message here.

Read entire Reuters News article here.

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